Five Reasons for Startup: Elimination

Job Loss, Opportunity, Youth, Experimentation, Because Startup
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At the outset of this series, I stated that there are an unlimited amount of reasons for someone to get into startup. So as we reach the end, the final breakdown of the final reason for startup, you probably won't be shocked that it's kind of a catch-all category. This is by design, because like most good journeys in life, we don't fully realize our reasons for embarking until we're already well on our way.

In some ways, I'm trying to persuade you into startup (or to stay with startup) with this series. I'm trying to convince you, you even might say I'm trying to trick you.

But I'm doing it for the right reasons.

When the startup community talks about startup, it's usually one of two ways. The first is a "go-for-broke" type of pitch -- usually a bunch of slogans you might find hanging on a wall in Successory-style framed image barf. I'm not a big fan of this, because I think it distills something awesome and complex into something pedestrian.

But I dislike the second type of pitch more -- the one that makes startup seem like a business class for people who have already been to business school. The folks that tell you that you're probably not ready, you'll probably hate it, and your cute little extension of the corporate world will lead you to a lot of pain and suffering if your financial projections are off by a few points.

Look, I'm not good at startup -- in the same way I'm not good at golf. The difference is, while I'll never show up on a professional golf tour, I can make a job, a career, even a life out of being an entrepreneur. So I'm going to keep learning, practicing, and playing.

Yeah, I need blind motivation at times, but it's MY blind motivation, not anything you can put a picture of a sailboat or a rainbow under to tell me to hang in there on Mondays. And I need financial projections, pitch decks, and market analysis, but there's NO UNIVERSAL MAP for how to do this. If I don't know the business of my business well enough to know my numbers, I need to focus on my business, not focus on where I put my hands when I'm pitching from a stage to a collection of uninterested VCs.

See? I'm already getting a little heated.

My point is: If you're not interested in startup for the Independence, Wealth, or Common Good that's inherent in it, and if your Personality isn't telling you that being an entrepreneur might be in your blood, startup can still be legitimate, satisfaction-filled way to spend your life. It may just come down to the process of Elimination.


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