VIDEO: Survive Or Die

Teaching Startup: The Show - Episode 1.6





You hear this all the time as a cautionary tale in startup -- Survive or Die! There will be times when you have to make the decision to power through all of your mistakes or give up under the weight of them. Unlike a corporate job, in startup, there's no structure to blend into, nothing to hide behind, and no one is going to swoop in and save you.

That's part of the growth process of becoming an entrepreneur. It's hard to do and not always fun to talk about, but we found a way.

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Do startups fail because the idea isn't any good? Not likely. Bad ideas rarely evolve into startups in the first place, because it's hard to rally people around a bad idea. But even good people executing on a good idea can make mistakes. If you aren't self aware enough to see those mistakes as they're happening, or if you aren't a leader enough to fix those mistakes quickly, that's usually when a startup goes off a cliff.

It's so much easier to just ride the failure train off the tracks than it is to self-analyze and self-adjust, but it's something every entrepreneur has to learn and do.


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